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MSU Student Housing Cooperative (MSU SHC) is a nonprofit student owned and operated housing cooperative serving students in the East Lansing, Michigan area. The MSU SHC was formed in 1969 as a federation of existing cooperatives in East Lansing. Since the first of the MSU SHC's member houses formed 69 years ago, SHC has accumulated more than 4,000 members.

HousesEdit

The MSU Student Housing Cooperative, since 1971, maintains 12 houses throughout East Lansing.

Current HousesEdit

# In 1971, the MSU SHC became a collective land trust with donations of property from Bower, Elsworth, and Hedrick cooperatives.

Houses No Longer A Part of the MSU SHCEdit

  • Atlantis
  • Eleutheria (located at 125 Evergreen Street, it was destroyed by fire in June 1972)

A Chronological History of the MSU SHC Houses Edit

1939 to 2002[1]
Year Event
1939 Hedrick co-op established at 415 Abbott
1940 Elsworth co-op established at 218 Albert
1941 Hedrick members purchase the house at 903 East Grand River
1944 Bower purchased in the summer at 708 E. Michigan State University
1946 Motts Co-op established; Ulrey men's co-op established
1947 Bower co-op established
1948 Howland co-op established; All Nations co-op established; Hedrick repopulated at 903 East Grand River
1949 Beal Street co-op established
1950 All Nations co-op closes; Elsworth sells 218 Albert, the members build 711 W. Grand River
1954 Hedrick co-op on 903 E. Grand River burns down
1956 Hedrick co-op rededication at 140 Haslett (now Collingood) by MSU President Hannah
1963 Howland co-op buys 548 M.A.C.
1964 Hedrick co-op purchases 146 Haslett (later to be Farency co-op)
1969 SHC forms as a federation of Bower, Elsworth and Hedrick; Ulrey Men's co-op closes, starts up Ulrey Trust Fund; Ulrey Women's co-op starts up at 437, 445 Abbott
1970 Eleutheria co-op established (rental property); Evergreen co-op established
1971 SHC becomes a collective land trust; Motts house closes, members move to 420 Evergreen (aka The Raft)
1972 The Raft is renamed Knight House co-op; Eleutheria caught on fire; Ulrey Women's co-op established at 505 M.A.C.; Eleutheria and Ulrey repopulate Nexus; Nexus established at 437/445 Abbott; Evergreen co-op sold to local apartment building owner's, Phunn: Bogue Street co-op rented at 207 Bogue.
1973 Haslett Street becomes Collingwood; 501 M.A.C. purchased (potentially new housing for Nexus or new Comm)
1974 Tralfamador co-op established at 501 M.A.C.
1975 Knight House renamed Major Raoul Lufberry; Phunn House purchased at 207 Bogue
1976 445 Abbott sold to a sorority; 152 Collingwood purchased as a part of Hedrick; Nexus closes at 437 Abbott; Phoenix established at 437 Abbott
1978 New Community: 415/425 Ann Street is purchased
1979 Phoenix closes at 437 Abbott
1980 Major Raoul Lufberry closes; SHC obtains a $1 million HUD loan for: Woodside (910 Abbott, a co-op for a year), New Community rehabilitation, Key Largo established at 146 Collingwood, and Atlantis
1982 Atlantis repopulated at 207 Bogue; Ulrey repopulated at 505 M.A.C.
1985 Elsworth co-op close, rented to [Asher Christian Scientists]; Ulrey renamed Zolton after Zolton Ferency at 505 M.A.C.
1986 146/152 Collingwood break away, renamed Key Largo
1987 Elsworth at 711 W Grand River rented to Sigma Alpha Mu (SAMmies); 146/152 Collingwood split; 152 Collingwood rented Asher Christian Scientists; 146 Collingwood becomes Key Largo
1988 501 M.A.C turned into a graduate co-op
1989 501 M.A.C. reopened to general membership
1991 Miles co-op established 152 Collingwood
1992 SAMmies expelled and repopulated as a Elsworth at 711 W Grand River
1993 Zolton closes at 505 M.A.C.
1994 Phoenix established at 239 Oakhill; 415 Ann repopulated as a co-op (Toad Lane); Key Largo renamed Ferency after Zolton Ferency
1995 Audre Lorde renamed Niko co-op
1996 Orion changes its name to NASA; Elsworth closes from Summer until the Fall
1997 NASA renamed Orion
1998 Bower repopulated by Antlantis, Elsworth, Hedrick, Miles, and Orion; Alliance between SHC and Circle Pines formed; SHC allows Sigma Pi exclusive rights to Phoenix co-op
2000 Phoenix repopulated by SHC, Sigma Pi moves to Niko
2001 Niko (Sigma Pi) renamed Shadowood
2002 Sigma Pi leaves Shadowood and leaves the SHC; Shadowood repopulated and renamed Mosier

A Brief History of Campus Cooperatives Edit

Some of the earliest student co-ops in the United States were established around the turn of the century. In Austin, Texas, and in Gainesville, Florida, students began by providing themselves with meal plans. These programs eventually led to early housing co-ops.


These co-ops continued, observing and participating in the rise of the Cooperative League of the USA (CLUSA), and weathering the First World War and the Red Scare of 1919. As the twenties came to an end and the Great Depression set in students, like most people in the US and Canada, were barely able to get by. However, the co-op activist and religious leader Toyohiko Kagawa provided the nation's students with a renewed vision of social and economic cooperation. With the spark of Kagawa's enthusiasm, the 1930's saw the establishment of such long-standing co-ops systems as those in Berkeley, California; Ann Arbor, Michigan; and Toronto, Ontario.

The Second World War slowed much of the momentum of this period; many co-op members were drafted for the war effort. However, the end of the war, with the introduction of the GI Bill, saw new demands for student housing and the establishment of co-op systems in Ithaca, New York; Oberlin, Ohio; and Lincoln, Nebraska.

The late forties also saw the first attempt at a national student co-op organization: the North American Student Cooperative League (NASCL). Although quite successful at first, NASCL lost its major funding source, CLUSA, who cut support in the mid-fifties.

In the sixties, the political fervor over the free speech movement and the antiwar movement brought new enthusiasm to student cooperatives, this time as a social and political alternative to the postindustrial capitalist system. Government support in the form of low-interest housing loans in the US and Canada also contributed to the new boom in student co-ops. In 1968, the new NASCL, the North American Students of Cooperation (NASCO), was formed. Since that time, NASCO has served as the main networking and support system for student co-ops.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

Notes Edit

  1. http://msu.coop/chonology

References Edit

  • "A Chronological History of the MSU SHC Houses", msu.coop.

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